Tag Archives: exhibit

the suburban: shana lutker/steve berrens

Today was the opening of the first summer show at The Suburban. Included in this exhibition are two artist’s from L.A., Shana Lutker and Stephen Berens. Stephen’s photographs which documented a posting for a lost dog throughout a neighborhood in Los Angeles, lined the walls of one of the exhibition spaces. He also had some of his books on display of courtyards and plazas, a trip to Italy, and more imagery similar to that of the documented dog poster. In the other gallery space Shana Lutker’s large books lay opened on a table for viewers to peruse for a single minute or all day if desired. Many of the books were part of her craigslist ad collection while a large red book seemed to be a collection of her dreams for the past 2 years all laid out as if they were individual newspaper articles.

The opening (as always) was an enjoyable social event on the lawn of Ms. Grabner and Mr. Killam’s home. The show is not to be missed and I highly encourage anyone in Chicago to try to make it out to Oak Park to see these compiled collections of books and photographs.

For those of you not familiar with the independently run artist exhibition space in Oak Park, IL I have included a bit of their statement below:
“The Suburban is an independently run artist exhibition space in Oak Park, IL. We give complete control to the artists in regards to what they choose to produce and exhibit. Thus it’s a pro artist and anti curator site. The Suburban is not driven by commercial interests. It is funded within the economy of our household. Its success is not grounded in sales, press or the conventional measures set forth by the international art apparatus, but by the individual criteria set forth by the artists and their exhibitions. In this, The Suburban is more closely aligned with the idea of studio practice than that of the site of distribution.”
-Michelle Grabner & Brad Killam

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Shana Lutker stands beside her book at The Suburban.

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Stephen Berens is photographed here beside his installation.

For more information about The Suburban please visit http://www.thesuburban.org

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the renaissance society: black is, black ain’t

Today I visited the Renaissance Society of Chicago, located in Hyde Park on the University of Chicago’s campus. “The Society presents art seldom seen
in the midwest, giving the public opportunities to investigate the most recent developments in contemporary art. At the same time, the museum is equally committed to fostering the development of Chicago’s own rich artistic resources”.

The current show , curated by Hamza Walker, is entitled Black Is, Black Ain’t. I was very impressed by the work included in the show from artist’s throughout the country, the show was powerful and many pieces have stuck with me. I enjoyed the works by William Pope L. particularly his cupped-flour sculptures which were scattered throughout the gallery on small make-shift shelves. The video pieces were interesting and very peculiar especially Joanna Rytel’s monologue-based performance/video work about a mixed-race relationship.

Artist’s included in the exhibition are as follows:
Terry Adkins | Edgar Arceneaux | Elizabeth Axtman | Jonathan Calm | Paul D’Amato | Deborah Grant | Todd Gray | Shannon Jackson | Thomas Johnson | Jason Lazarus | David Levinthal | Glenn Ligon | David McKenzie | Rodney McMillian | Jerome Mosley | Virginia Nimarkoh | Demetrius Oliver | Sze Lin Pang | Carl Pope | William Pope.L | Robert A. Pruitt | Randy Regier | Daniel Roth | Joanna Rytel | Andres Serrano | Hank Willis Thomas | Mickalene Thomas

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Glenn Ligon, Warm Broad Glow, 2005
Neon, 39 x 192 inches (Courtesy of Sender Collection, courtesy of Levin Art Group)

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Jonathan Calm, Baruch Runoff #2,2008
Pigment print, 40 x 50 inches (Courtesy of the artist and Caren Golden Fine Art, New York)

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(portion of press release)
“Taking its title from Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man, this exhibition will explore a shift in the rhetoric of race from an earlier emphasis on inclusion to a present moment where racial identity is being simultaneously rejected and retained. The exhibition will bring together works by 26 black and non-black artists whose work together examines a moment where the cultural production of so-called ‘blackness’ is concurrent with efforts to make race socially and politically irrelevant.”

For more information about the Renaissance Society please visit http://www.renaissancesociety.org/site/